December Meeting

Speaker: Stephen Valentine, West Virginia University

Topic: TBD

Date: Monday, December 12, 2022

Time: 6:15 pm Dinner, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form) . If you have submitted your vaccine card before, your status is already recorded.

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, December 9 if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: TBD

November Meeting

Speaker: Nathan Basisty, National Institute on Aging, NIH

Topic: Uncovering Aging Mechanisms Through a Proteomic Lens: From Protein Turnover to Surfaceomes

Date: Monday, November 14, 2022

Time: 6:15 pm Dinner, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form) . If you have submitted your vaccine card before, your status is already recorded.

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, November 11 if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a uniquely powerful tool to study basic mechanisms of aging. This talk will focus on how the Translational Geroproteomics Unit (NIA) leverages ‘geroproteomic’ approaches to develop biomarkers and therapeutic strategies against age related diseases stemming two major hallmarks of aging: loss of proteostasis and cellular senescence. Metabolic labeling studies have demonstrated that proteome turnover provides important insights into the biology of aging, however, measurement of whole animal turnover remains technically and computationally challenging. I will introduce a new freely available Skyline external tool, TurnoveR, that seamlessly integrates the computational pipeline analysis of protein turnover from metabolic labeling studies into the Skyline software environment. We hope this tool will facilitate the incorporation of protein turnover studies in the context of disease biology. Secondly, this talk will discuss how the Translational Geroproteomics Unit is leveraging secretome and surfaceome pipelines to develop strategies for quantifying and targeting pathogenic (senescent) cells that accumulate during aging to aid in the development of therapeutic against age-related diseases.

October Meeting

Speaker: Stephanie Cologna, University of Illinois Chicago

Topic: Mass Spectrometry Enabled Proteomics, Lipidomics and Imaging in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

Date: Monday, October 17, 2022

Time: 6:15 pm Dinner, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form) . If you have submitted your vaccine card before, your status is already recorded.

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, October 14 if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: Mass spectrometry-based proteomics and lipidomics are powerful strategies to understand molecular mechanisms associated with human disease. Our laboratory studies Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC), a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disorder that arises due to improper trafficking of cholesterol. As a result of the genetic defects in NPC, cholesterol storage is observed in late endosome/lysosome compartments. Subsequently, a series of downstream events occur including neuroinflammation, calcium imbalance, oxidative stress and progressive neuron loss with the disorder being ultimately fatal in the early adulthood years. In an effort to understand pathways associated with the downstream consequences of the genetic cause of NPC, we have employed mass
spectrometry imaging, quantitative proteomics and lipidomics in multiple models of NPC. In this seminar, I will share several examples of integrated ‘omics approach to reveal markers of NPC disease as well as seek insight into cell death in NPC using mass spectrometry.

September 2022 Meeting and Vendor Night

Speaker: Ling Hao, George Washington University

Topic: Capturing Organelle Dynamics with Multifaceted MS-Omics Strategies

Date: Monday, September 19, 2022

Time: 6:00 pm Dinner and Vendor Night, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form).

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, September 16th if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: Lysosomes and mitochondria are membrane-bound organelles in the cell that are responsible for trash-disposal and ATP production, respectively. Lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunctions have been linked to numerous human diseases, such as neurodegeneration, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. These organelles are highly dynamic and frequently interact with other cellular components in a transient fashion, which are difficult to capture with traditional immunoprecipitation and organelle isolation methods. Here, I will describe our recent efforts in developing proximity labeling proteomics, metabolomics, and dynamic SILAC approaches to characterize sub-organelle microenvironment and protein turnover in human iPSC-derived neurons. I will also
introduce our newly established universal and sample type-specific contaminant libraries that can benefit both DDA and DIA proteomics for the broad bottom-up proteomics community.