Friday, February 27th, 2015

Meetings

Notices

1.February 9, 2015 Meeting in Columbia; Speaker: Ryan M. Danell, Ph.D., Danell Consulting, Inc.; Topic: The Next Generation of Mass Spectrometry on Mars

2.Agilent Symposia at JHU (February 24) and NIH (February 25): Mass Spectrometry Applications in the Biomedical Sciences

3.Short Course on Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Vanderbilt University, April 13-16, 2015

4.Mass Spectrometry in Biology and Medicine (MSBM) Summer School, Dubrovnik, Croatia, July 5-11, 2015

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February 2015 Meeting

Speaker: Ryan M. Danell, Ph.D.; Danell Consulting, Inc.

Topic: The Next Generation of Mass Spectrometry on Mars

Date: Monday, February 9, 2015

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: Mass spectrometry originally arrived on Mars over 30 years ago with the Viking lander. Since then numerous instruments have sent back data from Mars. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment on NASA’s Curiosity rover is the latest and arguably the greatest mass spectrometer based instrument to operate on Mars. Still, NASA continues to look to the future and is actively building a next generation linear ion trap based mass spectrometer for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will travel to Mars on the European Space Agency’s ExoMars rover set to launch in 2018.

The overarching goals of the instruments sent to Mars have been to search for organic molecules and investigate the potential for the planet to support life. A great deal of data has been obtained thus far, but after a little more than two years on Mars, SAM has been able to detect the presence of organic molecule as well as demonstrate that Mars had the potential to support life at one time.

The goals of the MOMA instrument build on the capabilities of SAM in an effort to investigate the Martian environment with added breath and depth. The MOMA mass spectrometer consists of a custom linear ion trap mass spectrometer interfaced to two complementary ion sources: a laser desorption ionization (LDI) source operating at Mars ambient conditions (5-8 Torr of mainly CO2) and an electron ionization (EI) source interfaced to a gas chromatograph. The overall instrument design, function and performance have been specifically tuned for the Martian environment. Reliable operation under these conditions demanded many technological developments in order to achieve the desired performance while still fitting within the operational constraints of a Mars lander mission. The complete MOMA design has been finalized and the full capabilities of the instrument have been demonstrated with an engineering test unit matching the form, fit and function of the final design that will be sent to Mars. These capabilities, when applied to the analysis of samples from the surface and subsurface of Mars, have the potential to significantly enhance our understanding of what (if any) past or present life exists on one of Earth’s nearest neighbors.

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January 2015 Meeting

Speaker: David R. Goodlett, Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore

Topic: Development of Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulization as an Ion Source

Date: Monday, January 12, 2015

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: A surface acoustic wave (SAW) is an acoustic wave traveling along the surface of a material. This phenomenon has been studied extensively in the field of electronics where SAW devices are widely used as filters, oscillators and transformers1. In 2010 the first paper describing their use for producing ions for mass spectrometric detection was published, and the phrase ‘surface acoustic wave nebulization’ (SAWN) coined to describe this phenomenon2. Ions produced by SAWN are done so either in a continuous electrospray ionization (ESI) like mode or an intermittent manner like matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). In either mode nebulization occurs from a planar surface, with the opportunity to detect either positive- or negative-ions. Notably, SAWN mass spectra, of chemical compounds such as peptides and proteins that are chemically basic in nature, commonly exhibit a lower average charge state distribution than ESI produces from the same solution. Importantly, given that no DC voltage is applied to the liquid sample to produce ions, the SAWN nebulized ions can have lower internal energy than ESI or MALDI generated ions3. We’ll present the results of our latest efforts to develop this method and couple it to digital microfluidics for sample preparation on chip.

1. Lange, K.; Rapp, B. E.; Rapp, M., Surface acoustic wave biosensors: a review. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 2008, 391 (5), 1509-1519.
2. Heron, S. R.; Wilson, R.; Shaffer, S. A.; Goodlett, D. R.; Cooper, J. M., Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulization of Peptides As a Microfluidic Interface for Mass Spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry 2010, 82 (10), 3985-3989.
3. Huang, Y.; Yoon, S. H.; Heron, S. R.; Masselon, C. D.; Edgar, J. S.; Tureček, F.; Goodlett, D. R., Surface acoustic wave nebulization produces ions with lower internal energy than electrospray ionization. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 2012, 23 (6), 1062-70.

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