Merger with Washington Chromatography Discussion Group

The Washington Chromatography Discussion Group is merging into the Washington-Baltimore Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group in 2023. You can read more about the Chromatography Group on the History page.

The Washington Chromatography Discussion Group (WCDG) began in the early 1960s as an informal group of gas chromatographers who gathered to exchange ideas related to separation science. In 1965, the group, comprised of distinguished scientists from government, academia, and industry, formally became known as the “Washington Area Gas Chromatography Discussion Group”. The first president was M. Beroza, and president-elect and program chairperson was I. Hornstein, both from the USDA. The group met once a month from September through June in several locations throughout the area to hear an invited speaker and share information. As the group gained popularity, its activities included seminars, dinners, short courses, and symposia. By 1970, HPLC had become a viable technique so the group’s name was changed to the more encompassing “Washington Chromatography Discussion Group.” The group’s meetings were held regularly at one location, the office of Hewlett-Packard in Rockville, Maryland, and instrument manufacturers began sponsoring a light dinner before each meeting. Meetings were later held at the U.S. Pharmacopeia in Rockville and then at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research in Rockville.

June 2023 Meeting

Topic: Post-ASMS Poster Night and ASMS Travel Award Presentations
All attendees are invited to put up an ASMS poster

Date: Monday, June 12, 2023

Time: 6:15 pm Dinner and ASMS posters, 7:30 pm Presentations

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, June 9 if you will be attending the dinner and/or if you will participate in the poster session.

ASMS Travel Award Recipients:

    • Bowen Shen, University of Maryland

: “Electrophoresis-Correlative Mass Spectrometry Enables Ultrasensitive Proteomics”

    • Ashley Frankenfield, George Washington University

: “Deep Proteome Turnover in human iPSC-derived Neurons”

    • Delaney Rutherford, National Institute on Aging

: “Mass Spectrometry Analysis with Cellular Thermal Shift Assay to Assess Senolytic Pathways in Senescent Monocytes”

Thank you to our 2022-2023 sponsors!

2023 Young Investigator Travel Award Winners

2023 Washington-Baltimore MSDG Young Investigator Travel Award Recipients

Congratulations to the following recipients of the WBMSDG Young Investigator Travel Awards

Bowen Shen, University of Maryland (Advisor: Peter Nemes), 1st place: “Electrophoresis-Correlative Mass Spectrometry Enables Ultrasensitive Proteomics”

Ashley Frankenfield, George Washington University (Advisor: Ling Hao), 2nd place: “Deep Proteome Turnover in human iPSC-derived Neurons”

Delaney Rutherford, National Institute on Aging (Advisor: Nathan Basisty), 3rd place: “Mass Spectrometry Analysis with Cellular Thermal Shift Assay to Assess Senolytic Pathways in Senescent Monocytes”

May Meeting

Speaker: Aleksandra Nita-Lazar, NIAID, NIH

Topic: Macrophage signaling mechanisms: deciphering protein networks

Date: Monday, May 15, 2023

Time: 6:15 pm Dinner, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form) . If you have submitted your vaccine card before, your status is already recorded.

Dinner: Please RSVP to Andy Qi (andy.yue.qi@gmail.com) by Friday, May 12 if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is essential for generating effective innate immune responses. Quantitative differences dependent on the dose and timing of the stimulus critically affect cell function and often involve proteins that are not components of widely shared transduction pathways. Mathematical modeling is an important approach to better understand how these signaling networks function in time and space. We have successfully modeled the S1P signaling pathway in macrophages using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to measure the absolute abundance of the pathway proteins. The resulting values became parameters in a computational pathway model. To model the TLR signaling networks, we developed assays for the canonical
TLR signaling pathway and related proteins and phosphoproteins and used parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) with heavy-labeled internal peptide standards to quantify protein and phosphorylated protein molecule numbers per cell in untreated and LPS-stimulated macrophages. The absolute protein abundance values were entered into a model of the TLR pathway developed using Simmune, the rule-based modeling tool with a visual interface. To reach beyond basal level quantification, the TLR signaling network model is tested further and combined with global proteomic approaches to discover
biologically important new proteins, protein complexes and PTMs involved in this innate immune pathway. The protein and PTM levels are quantified in macrophages under diverse, but well-defined conditions (different TLR ligands, whole pathogens, and cells with mutations in specific signaling molecules). These data will allow to parameterize and test the TLR network model under a variety of conditions. Together, the interconnected projects will lead to the better understanding how the immune signaling pathways are regulated and activated during an infection. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of NIAID, NIH.

Thank you to our 2022-2023 sponsors!

2023 Young Investigator Travel Awards

The Washington-Baltimore Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group (WBMSDG) is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2023 Young Investigator Travel Awards. Awards will be granted to outstanding young investigators at the undergraduate or graduate student level to support travel to the 71st ASMS Conference. Undergraduate and graduate students in laboratories and institutions traditionally associated with the WBMSDG in the following geographic regions are encouraged to apply: from Richmond and Charlottesville, VA to the South and Newark, DE to the North.

Three awards will be given. 1st place: $650, 2nd place: $550, 3rd place: $450.

Complete applications consist of the following items:
1. Travel Grant 2023 Application form (includes a checklist)
2. Electronic copy of ASMS abstract
3. Evidence of abstract acceptance by ASMS indicating the presentation format (poster or oral)
4. Curriculum Vitae or Resume
5. Two-page summary of research project (figures can be included)
6. Letter of recommendation from advisor

Applicants should submit items 1-5 listed above as a single PDF file to Dr. Dapeng Chen. Item 6 must be sent directly by the applicant’s advisor to Dr. Dapeng Chen:

Dapeng Chen, PhD
WBMSDG co-chair
dapeng.chen@zeteotech.com

The deadline for applications is 5 PM EST on Friday, April 28th, 2023. A panel of WBMSDG members will act as reviewers. Please note, previous winners are encouraged to apply if the award application for the upcoming ASMS conference significantly differs from the previously successful application. In the event that ASMS is cancelled, awards will be given out as well as prize amounts up to the full award to cover any incurred costs associated with ASMS travel. Successful applicants will be expected to give a 10-minute oral presentation at the post-ASMS WBMSDG meeting on June 23rd, 2023 at Shimadzu Scientific in Columbia, MD.