Monday, May 25th, 2015

Notices

May 3, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

1.May 11, 2015 Meeting in Columbia; Speaker: Professor Mary T. Rodgers, Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University; Topic: Structures and Glycosidic Bond Stability of DNA and RNA Nucleosides Probed by a Synergy of Theory and Tandem Mass Spectrometry Techniques

2.2015 MSDG Young Investigator Travel Awards

3.MS Imagery Analysis System for Medical Applications – A Strategic Workshop; June 5, 2015, Baltimore, MD

4.Mass Spectrometry in Biology and Medicine (MSBM) Summer School, Dubrovnik, Croatia, July 5-11, 2015

5.12th Symposium on the Practical Application of Mass Spectrometry in the Biotechnology Industry (Mass Spec 2015); Brooklyn, New York; September 22-25, 2015

May 2015 MSDG Meeting

May 3, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

Speaker: Professor Mary T. Rodgers, Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University

Topic: Structures and Glycosidic Bond Stability of DNA and RNA Nucleosides Probed by a Synergy of Theory and Tandem Mass Spectrometry Techniques

Date: Monday, May 11, 2015

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: Nucleosides are N-glycosides of ribose and 2′-deoxyribose, the basic building blocks of nucleic acids: ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Reactions leading to glycosidic bond cleavage are of great interest for a variety of reasons; in particular, they are amongst the most common reactions involved in DNA repair and nucleobase salvage. Protonation or noncovalent interactions with metal cations facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond and are therefore generally involved in the enzymatic processes that lead to glycosidic bond cleavage in biological systems. In this presentation, I will discuss the use of a variety of tandem mass spectrometers (guided ion beam tandem, quadrupole ion trap, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance) and mass spectrometry techniques (energy-resolved collision induced dissociation (ER-CID) under single and multiple collision conditions as well as wavelength resolved infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy) and synergistic electronic structure calculations to elucidate the structures and glycosidic bond stability of a variety of DNA and RNA nucleosides. Trends as a function of nucleobase identity, the presence or absence of the 2′-hydroxyl substituent, and modifications will be examined.

April 2015 MSDG Meeting

March 28, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

Speaker: Matthew C. Crowe, Ph.D.; The Dow Chemical Company

Topic: Multidimensional Liquid Separations Coupled to Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Complex Polymers

Date: Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:00 pm: Presentation

Location: US Pharmacopeia, 12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852
(directions to this location are found at http://www.wbmsdg.org)
(Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: In an effort to comprehensively characterize the molecular structure of complex tetrapolymers up to 10,000 u, multidimensional separations coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) were developed. Polymers composed of four different monomers were characterized to determine if performance differences could be correlated with differences in molecular structure. The polymers were analyzed with negative polarity ESI/MS, taking advantage of the presence of a permanent negative charge on one of the monomers. Direct infusion ESI/MS experiments did not provide full molecular weight coverage, so ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) ESI/MS methods were developed which allowed separation of polymer components by molecular structure and the observation of a wider polymer molecular weight range with mass spectrometry. The UHPLC/ESI/MS results were dominated by low molecular weight polymer signals, making sample-to-sample comparisons difficult. To combat this, a size exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractionation technique was developed to separate polymer components by molecular weight prior to UHPLC/ESI/MS analysis. SEC fractionation followed by UHPLC/ELSD and UHPLC/ESI/MS of collected fractions was used to analyze complex tetrapolymers, increasing the mass range observable with ESI/MS over what was seen with direct infusion ESI/MS and UHPLC/ESI/MS. The results of these experiments will be presented, along with what was learned about the strengths and limitations of this analytical approach. Data analysis allowing statistical differentiation of complex polymer samples will also be discussed.

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