Saturday, March 7th, 2015

Notices

March 1, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

1.March 16, 2015 MSDG Meeting in Columbia; Speaker: Greg Gillen, Ph.D., NIST ; Topic: Surface and Trace Chemical Analysis – Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Cluster Beams and Homeland Security

2.Chromatography Forum of Delaware Valley (CFDV) Annual Short Course and Symposium: April 15-16, 2015; Analytical Separations Utilized in Biotechnology R&D

3.Short Course on Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Vanderbilt University, April 13-16, 2015

4.Mass Spectrometry in Biology and Medicine (MSBM) Summer School, Dubrovnik, Croatia, July 5-11, 2015

March 2015 MSDG Meeting

March 1, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

Speaker: Greg Gillen, Ph.D.; NIST

Topic: Surface and Trace Chemical Analysis – Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Cluster Beams and Homeland Security

Date: Monday, March 16, 2015

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: There is great interest in the continued development of cluster primary ion beams for applications in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). This interest is motivated by several unique aspects of the interaction between energetic cluster ions and surfaces. When a cluster ion strikes a surface, it dissociates into its constituents atoms. Each of the constituent atoms retains a fraction of the initial energy of the cluster ion. For example, a C60+ cluster ion with an impact energy of 3000 eV would dissociate after impacting the target surface into 60 carbon atoms each with an impact energy of only 50 eV. Since the depth resolution of a SIMS depth profile is directly related to the primary projectile energy, the use of a cluster ion provides a method for obtaining ultra-high resolution SIMS depth profiles. The dissociation of a cluster ion also leads to multiple individual primary particle impacts that are correlated both temporally and spatially. This results in a localized deposition of energy in the near-surface region of the sample leading to a several order of magnitude enhancement in the number of atoms or molecules desorbed from a surface by each cluster impact. Also, for some organic materials, the accumulation of primary beam-induced damage is minimized allowing stable characteristic molecular ion signals to be obtained at high primary ion doses (dynamic SIMS conditions). For some time we have been involved in an effort to develop the cluster primary beam SIMS capability on both magnetic sector and time-of-flight SIMS instruments. Several types of cluster ion sources are used for this project including; SF5+ , C8-, C60+ and Bi3+. Several years ago we began a pilot study to explore the potential use of cluster SIMS for examination of contraband materials (explosives and narcotics). These experiments led to the growth of a new research program focused on the chemical analysis of these contraband materials to support airport and military checkpoint security screening applications as well as forensics. This metrology and standards program has evolved to include the use of a variety of micro analytical tools including atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry to study the chemical composition of trace contraband residues on various surfaces. Based on this information, optimized protocols and sampling materials have been developed for field collection of contraband residues. Experiments on aerodynamic based particle collection have provided new insights into trace sampling and have resulted in the construction of prototype systems for non contact trace detection of particles from various surfaces. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of surface mass spectrometry at NIST followed by a look “inside” the science of trace detection technology with an emphasis on measurement tools, standards and protocols we have developed in our laboratory to improve and optimize various detection technologies. Included in the presentation will be a discussion of the critical role of standards in homeland security and a description of the production of test articles containing explosives and narcotics that are fabricated using advanced materials deposition inkjet printer systems.

February 2015 Meeting

February 1, 2015 by admin  
Filed under Meetings

Speaker: Ryan M. Danell, Ph.D.; Danell Consulting, Inc.

Topic: The Next Generation of Mass Spectrometry on Mars

Date: Monday, February 9, 2015

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Asher Newsome (graham.newsome.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: Mass spectrometry originally arrived on Mars over 30 years ago with the Viking lander. Since then numerous instruments have sent back data from Mars. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment on NASA’s Curiosity rover is the latest and arguably the greatest mass spectrometer based instrument to operate on Mars. Still, NASA continues to look to the future and is actively building a next generation linear ion trap based mass spectrometer for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will travel to Mars on the European Space Agency’s ExoMars rover set to launch in 2018.

The overarching goals of the instruments sent to Mars have been to search for organic molecules and investigate the potential for the planet to support life. A great deal of data has been obtained thus far, but after a little more than two years on Mars, SAM has been able to detect the presence of organic molecule as well as demonstrate that Mars had the potential to support life at one time.

The goals of the MOMA instrument build on the capabilities of SAM in an effort to investigate the Martian environment with added breath and depth. The MOMA mass spectrometer consists of a custom linear ion trap mass spectrometer interfaced to two complementary ion sources: a laser desorption ionization (LDI) source operating at Mars ambient conditions (5-8 Torr of mainly CO2) and an electron ionization (EI) source interfaced to a gas chromatograph. The overall instrument design, function and performance have been specifically tuned for the Martian environment. Reliable operation under these conditions demanded many technological developments in order to achieve the desired performance while still fitting within the operational constraints of a Mars lander mission. The complete MOMA design has been finalized and the full capabilities of the instrument have been demonstrated with an engineering test unit matching the form, fit and function of the final design that will be sent to Mars. These capabilities, when applied to the analysis of samples from the surface and subsurface of Mars, have the potential to significantly enhance our understanding of what (if any) past or present life exists on one of Earth’s nearest neighbors.

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