Friday, July 29th, 2016

Notices

June 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Meetings

1.June 13, 2016 WBMSDG Meeting in Columbia; Topic: Post-ASMS Poster Night and ASMS Travel Award Presentations

2.2016 Washington-Baltimore MSDG Young Investigator Travel Award Recipients

June Meeting

June 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Meetings

Topic: Post-ASMS Poster Night and ASMS Travel Award Presentations

Date: Monday, June 13, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm: Dinner and Poster Session; 7:15 pm: Award Recipient Presentations

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Poster Session Please RSVP to Jace Jones(jjones@rx.umaryland.edu) if you will be attending dinner or presenting a poster.

ASMS Travel Award Recipients

  • Sylwia Stopka, The George Washington University
  • Lucia Geis Asteggiante, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Camille Lombard-Banek, The George Washington University
  • Lisa Leung, University of Maryland, Baltimore

May Meeting

May 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Meetings

Speaker: Peter Nemes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, The George Washington University

Topic: Uncovering Molecular Cell Heterogeneity in the Cleavage-Stage Vertebrate Embryo using Single-cell Mass Spectrometry

Date: Monday, May 9, 2016

Time: 6:15 pm: Dinner and Social Hour; 7:15 pm: Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)

Dinner and Social Hour Please RSVP to Jace Jones(jjones@rx.umaryland.edu) if you will be attending dinner.

Abstract: How differential gene expression establishes tissue-specific cell differentiation during normal embryonic development is not fully understood, because it has been technologically challenging to measure broad types of proteins and metabolites in single embryonic cells. Although mass spectrometry is the method of choice for the discovery measurement of these molecules, typical workflows in the field combine a large cohort, often millions, of cells to improve detection performance. Because pooling inherently averages out the analytical signal among components of the sample, chemical information specific to each cell is lost. In this talk, we will explore a single-cell mass spectrometry technology we have recently developed to compare the molecular state of single embryonic cells in the early developing (cleavage-stage) vertebrate embryo. We use the South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), a powerful model in cell and developmental biology, to validate the single-cell mass spectrometry platform. Next, we use the platform to compare the metabolic and proteomic activity of embryonic cells that give rise to different types of tissues from the 16-cell Xenopus embryo. Finally, we present targeted experiments, in which new developmental roles are discovered for small molecules. Single-cell mass spectrometry opens new investigative avenues for cell and developmental biology to help better understand the molecular players of normal development.…

Next Page »