3rd Annual North American Mass Spectrometry Summer School

3rd Annual North American Mass Spectrometry Summer School

June 29 – July 1, 2021 Virtual

Join us for our third annual mass spectrometry summer school. We are proud to have assembled over a dozen world leading experts in mass spectrometry for this three-day course. Our goal is to provide our students, both from academia and industry, an engaging and inspiring program covering the latest in the application of mass spectrometry to omic analyses. Tutorial lectures range from mass analyzers to the basics of data analysis. Also planned are several workshops – aimed at both scientific and professional development. This program is made possible by generous funding from the National Science Foundation (Integrated Organismal Systems, Plant Genome Research Program, Grant No. 2010789) and the National Institutes of Health National Center for Quantitative Biology of Complex Systems (P41 GM108538). As such, there is no cost to participate.

Registration closes on May 15, 2021: https://www.ncqbcs.com/resources/training/summer-school

Expert Instructors:
Scott McLuckey | Purdue University
Rachel Loo | University of California-Los Angeles
Joshua Coon | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Shawnna Buttery | STAR Protocols, Cell Press
Jesper Velgaard Olsen | University of Copenhagen
Lingjun Li | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jürgen Cox | Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry
Edward Huttlin | Harvard University
Susan Olesik | Ohio State University
Evgenia Shishkova | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jessica Prenni | Colorado State University
Vicki Wysocki | Ohio State University
John Bowden | University of Florida

Tutorial Lectures:
Tandem MS
Separations
Mass analyzers
Ionization
Data acquisition
Quantification
Data analysis
Experimental design
PTMs
Metabolomics
Lipidomics
Top-down/Native MS

Workshops:
Mass analyzers
Data analysis
Telling your science story
Science writing
Science illustrations

Skyline Short Course

In collaboration with the Skyline team at University of Washington, the Duke Proteomics and Metabolomics Shared Resource will host a new Skyline Short Course this fall (Sept 17-21) at the newly renovated Chesterfield Building in downtown Durham, NC. The only week-long Skyline short course in the Southeast, Skyline@Duke will cover peptide and small molecule quantification from discovery (MS1 and DIA) workflows as well as the fundamentals and practical application of targeted quantification. Additionally, this course offers guest lectures from experts in the fields of targeted quantification, translational medicine, clinical biomarker quantification, ion mobility mass spectrometry, and small molecule quantification in Skyline. Attendees should expect to leave with a working knowledge of using Skyline in a variety of peptide and small molecule quantification applications.

The application deadline for the course is June 22nd. Course agenda, instructors and registration information can be found at https://skyline.ms/2018-duke-course.url.

UMBC Proteomics/mass spectrometry Workshop

The UMBC proteomics/mass spectrometry facility is hosting a hands-on workshop on mass spectrometry tools for proteomics. The workshop is taking place February, 25-27 and will center on the facility nanoLC-MS system. Participants will learn underling theory of mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography and protein database searching approaches. The hands-on training on the instrument operation will supplement theory.

To register, contact: Dr. Alexander Gapeev, Manager, MS Facility, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

gapeev@umbc.edu.   See the MSDG web site for further details.

December 15, 2008 WBMSDG Meeting

Speaker: Dr. Justin Hettick; CDC NIOSH in Morgantown

Topic: Discrimination of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS

Abstract: Unambiguous identification of microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi is essential for effective surveillance and treatment of disease.  Unfortunately, diagnosis by classical microbiological methods often requires lengthy culture procedures or subjective micro-and macroscopic evaluations.  To stem the spread of disease, rapid procedures for the accurate identification of microorganisms are necessary.  To that end, we have been developing mass spectrometry-based tools for the analysis of bacteria and fungi.

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) can be used to generate highly reproducible, characteristic “fingerprint” mass spectra.  These “fingerprint” mass spectra may be reduced to a subset of significant mass-to-charge values through statistical tools and compared against a reference library.  Using this technique, microorganisms can be easily identified at the species and strain level with error rates approaching zero.

Time: 7:30 pm

Location
: Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Inc. Training Center, 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046

Directions
: Shimadzu Scientific Instruments

Mass Spec in BioTech Workshop

Date: October 20-22, 2008.
Location: UMBC
Contact: Alexei Gapeev, Ph.D.; University of Maryland, Baltimore County Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250 office (410)455-6251 fax (410)455-2608 gapeev@umbc.edu

UMBC mass spectrometry facility is hosting a workshop on mass spectrometry tools for proteomics. The workshop will be held October 20-22 at the main UMBC campus. It will center on the facility nanoLC-MS system. The participants will learn underlying theory of mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography and protein database searching approaches. Hands-on training on the instrument (ThermoFisher LTQ) operation will supplement theory.

Expected outcome: The main goal of the workshop is to provide enough knowledge and hands-on experience so that, upon completion, attendees are able to independently plan experiments, prepare adequate samples, use the instrument in a productive way, recognize problems, conduct database search and interpret experimental results.

Who should attend: Prospective users of the recently installed nano-LC-MS system. Those interested in learning the mass spectrometry based proteomics. The workshop agenda is below: Day 1. Morning (9:30-12 am) and afternoon (1:30-2:30 pm): Instrument operation demonstration. Lecture. Nano-LC front end operation. Introduction to mass spectrometry as applied to the instrument and the discipline of proteomics. Day 1. Afternoon (2:30-4:30 pm):Hands-on exercise: Setting LC protocol and simple MS run. Setting up the instrument and software options. Setting up and running sequences. Day 2. Morning (9:30-12 am): Lecture. Topics include: Ion formation in the ESI source. Ion transmission and detection basics. MS scan modes (full scan, MS/MS, data dependent) and their utilization in mass spectrometry experiments. Protein ID workflow. Day 2. Afternoon: Hands-on exercise. Setting up a data dependent run. Data analysis software: Using software to display data, make annotations, manipulate other display options (e.g. ranges, background subtraction), export to other applications. Day 3. Hands on exercise. Database searching using BioWorks (Sequest) to mine for proteomics information. This section will include the sequest process overview, topics on obtaining a database, creating a database subset, indexing a database to speed up a search, setting specific parameters, interpreting the search data. The participants will analyze data acquired in day 2 and correlate data quality with the methods used.