2021 Washington-Baltimore MSDG Young Investigator Travel Award Recipients

Congratulations to the following recipients of the WBMSDG Young Investigator Travel Awards:

Anh Tran, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (Advisor: Jace Jones), 1st place: “High Resolution Ion Mobility of Sphingolipids: a Multi-Adduct Perspective”

Aparna Baxi & Jie Li, University of Maryland (Advisor: Peter Nemes), 2nd place: “In “Proteo-Metabolomics of Spemann’s Organizer in the Vertebrate (Frog) Embryo” and “In Vivo Subcellular Mass Spectrometry Enables Systems Biology in Single Embryonic Cells”

Amanda Belunis, University of Maryland Baltimore County (Advisor: William R. LaCourse), 3rd place: “EPA 537.1 method validation for the detection of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in drinking water sources”

Moved to Virtual: October 2021 Meeting

Speaker: Peter Nemes, University of Maryland

Topic: Mass Spectrometry for Discovering the Cell

Date: Monday, October 18, 2021

Time: 6:45 Virtual Social, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: MOVED ONLINE. See Zoom invite in email on October 14.

Abstract: Knowledge of all the types of molecules that are produced in cells as they establish different tissues and organs is key to understanding normal development and design efficient therapeutics. Even today, after the sequencing of entire genomes, there is limited information on how molecules downstream, such as proteins and metabolites, contribute to cell processes. The limitation has been a lack of sufficiently sensitive mass spectrometry technologies that can measure these biomolecules with scalability in space and time and compatibility for live development, a prerequisite for functional biology. In this presentation, we will discuss technological developments from our laboratory to to transform mass spectrometry proteomics and metabolomics to single cells. We used these technologies to determine the proteomic and metabolomic profile of identified cells in live Xenopus laevis frog embryos and neurons in mouse brain tissues. Molecular measurements with separation using capillary electrophoresis and detection by (trapped ion mobility) time-of-flight or orbitrap mass spectrometry revealed quantitative molecular differences between cells of different phenotypes. Through follow-up functional experiments, we discovered molecules capable of altering normal cell fate decisions in the chordate embryo. The technology was scalable to smaller cells, including electrophysiologically identified neurons in the mouse brain. Quantification of ~300–800 different proteins revealed reproducible proteomic differences between dopaminergic, serotonergic, and parvalbumin interneurons. Microprobe capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry expands the molecular toolbox of cell biology and neuroscience.

Friday deadline: 2021 Young Investigator Travel Awards

2021 Washington-Baltimore MSDG Young Investigator Travel Awards

The Washington-Baltimore Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group (WBMSDG) is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2021 Young Investigator Travel Awards. Awards will be granted to outstanding young investigators at the undergraduate or graduate student level to support travel to the 69th ASMS Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Undergraduate and graduate students in laboratories and institutions traditionally associated with the WBMSDG in the following geographic regions are encouraged to apply: from Richmond and Charlottesville, VA to the South and Newark, DE to the North. Three awards will be given. 1st place: $600, 2nd place: $500, 3rd place: $400.

Complete applications consist of the following items:
1. Travel Grant 2021 Application form (includes a checklist)
2. Electronic copy of ASMS abstract
3. Evidence of abstract acceptance by ASMS indicating the presentation format (poster or oral)
4. Curriculum Vitae or Resume
5. Two-page summary of research project (figures can be included)
6. Letter of recommendation from advisor

Applicants should submit Items 1-5 listed above as a single PDF file to Dr. Zongming Fu. Item 6 must be sent directly by the applicant’s advisor to Dr. Zongming Fu:

Zongming Fu, Ph.D.
Senior Manager
GSK Vaccines
14200 Shady Grove Road
Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: (301) 412-5727
Email: zongming.x.fu@gsk.com

The deadline for applications is 5:00 PM EST on Friday, September 24th, 2021. A panel of WBMSDG members will act as reviewers. Please note, previous winners are encouraged to apply if the award application for the upcoming ASMS conference significantly differs from the previously successful application. In the event that ASMS is cancelled, awards will be given out as well as prize amounts up to the full award to cover any incurred costs associated with ASMS travel. Successful applicants will be expected to give a 10-minute oral presentation at the post-ASMS WBMSDG meeting on November 15th, 2021 at Shimadzu Scientific in Columbia, MD.

September 2021 Meeting and Vendor Night

Speaker: Matthew S. Glover, AstraZeneca

Topic: Development of ion mobility-mass spectrometry methods for improved identification of microbiome-derived metabolites

Date: Monday, September 20, 2021

Time: 6:00 pm Dinner (outdoors) and Vendor Night, 7:15 pm Presentation

Location: Shimadzu Scientific Instrument, Inc. Training Center 7100 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (Directions)
This will be an in-person meeting. Attendees are required to show a vaccine card (either at the door or in advance using the web form) and to wear a mask.

Dinner: Please RSVP to Dapeng Chen (cdpumd@gmail.com) by Friday, September 17th if you will be attending the dinner.

Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests the human microbiome influences numerous biological processes and perturbation of the microbiome is associated with a variety of diseases. The microbiome influences host health through generation and modification of metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids, bile acids, and tryptophan catabolites. To unravel the role of the microbiome in health and disease, there is a need for high-throughput analytical techniques capable of identifying and quantifying microbiome-derived metabolites in complex biological samples such as plasma and feces. Implementing ion mobility (IM) techniques into traditional LC-MS/MS workflows has emerged as a promising strategy for improving metabolomic workflows due to the orthogonality of IM separations and utility of collision cross section (CCS) measurements for improving identifications of biomolecules in complex mixtures. Here, I will describe the development and optimization of LC-IM-MS methods and accompanying CCS databases for improved characterization of microbiome-derived metabolites in support of microbiome research.